7 Common Problems Students Face During University Life

Starting university is like starting a new life. When students leave home for university, they embark on a new journey, one that of self-reliance and self-discovery, which largely shapes up their outlook on life in the longer run.

Most students are not prepared for the challenges of university and end up being overwhelmed, which results in them taking extra time to adjust to their new life. That is fine, as long as you eventually get comfortable with university life, but a far better course of action would be to prepare yourself, mentally and emotionally, for any problem you may face at college and university level.

Here are a few issues you should be ready to deal with as a university student.

1. Adjustment to New Life

Whether you are a student experiencing the campus environment for the first time or going back to the campus life after spending the vacation at home, there will be a period of adjustment, more so in the first scenario.

The first year of university is always extra hard when it comes to adjustment to university life so you should be expecting to at least get a culture shock because of how different things would be compared to home or school. Additionally, it is important to not get in a frenzy over getting everything right. Give yourself some time, and expect to get a little bamboozled, but always stay confident that eventually you will come to love the university life.

2. Homesickness

Since it is the first time being away from home for most students, homesickness can strike very hard. However, thanks to the modern means of communication, most students feeling homesick can stay connected with their parents, family members and friends over the internet.

3. Pressure of Studies

Most students are paying their education expenses themselves so the pressure on them to get good grades is immense. Even if it is not them paying, there are still massive social and educational repercussions of not succeeding in the studies. Students should expect the studies to be much harder than before, and at the same time, should focus more on learning rather than getting a good GPA.

4. Cost of Education

Ever since the most recent increase in the cost of higher education in the UK, the number of students seeking professional counseling has significantly increased. Mental health issues are surfacing more than ever in students according to a survey by the National Students Union (NUS).

You should realize that the only way you can avoid mental anxiety and make the expenses worth is when you enjoy your time in the university, focus on your studies and keep a nice balance between the two.

5. Finding New Friends

It is difficult to make friends at a new place, but don’t make the mistake of thinking that you will have to fit in with people who have different interests in order to make new friends at university. You can be yourself and find friends at the same time, you just have to be patient and involve yourself in activities that you like.

6. Housing Problems

You may get a place in the hostel or dorm, but it is really difficult to find student accommodation that is right for you. You have to consider factors such as distance, rent rates, facilities, roommates etc. Students face housing problems all the time so if you can, have a place ready before you leave home. Student accommodation is a big issue in UK and you would do well to have a solution prepared.

7. Time Management

From trying to study to living alone and doing the required chores, to maintaining a social life, to possibly working some sort of a job to help with expenses, students don’t have the “time” to manage and think about their time. They sleep in irregular patterns and do everything at the last minute.

This kind of behavior is unsustainable and therefore, you need to at least set a rough timetable and start utilizing your time much more efficiently. You will be surprised at the amount of free time you’ll start to have on your hands.

College Prep: Questions To Ask When Considering A Post-Secondary Education

As high school students contemplate their future, their plans often include going to college. College prep classes begin early on in the high school career and can be very advantageous to those planning to further their education. However, some students may still be on the fence as to whether or not they should go to college.

For students planning to attend a post-secondary institution, it is crucial to take the time to carefully weigh all of the available options before finalizing decisions about their educational future. There is often a great amount of pressure on high school kids to make the right choice, which can cause unnecessary tension and stress. To make the decision somewhat easier, it is important to ask the right questions in order to make the right choice.

Why Go To A University?

The first thing to consider is whether or not the student wants to get a post-secondary education. Some kids will work on their college prep classes for years because furthering their education is a certainty. However, some students may not even feel the need to think about it until senior year. If students are still undecided about whether or not to attend a university, it is important that they ask themselves if they are serious and diligent enough to take on such a major investment.

The student should consider several factors to determine if he or she should attend a university. For instance, what type of career does he or she desire? Students wishing to become medical doctors, for example, must achieve a four-year degree before starting down the medical path. On the other hand, students interested in pursuing a trade like carpentry or electrical work might only need a two-year degree or vocational diploma. Students should also consider their financial situation and whether they are willing to invest in high tuition costs.

How Much Will It Cost?

There is no doubt about it; going to a university is expensive. Tuition alone costs thousands of dollars, on top of living expenses, books, and other school needs. The cost of going to school will largely depend on the type of university the student chooses to attend. Public universities are much less costly than private colleges, and choosing to attend an in-state school can often cut down on tuition and living expenses.

Students should consider what they are willing to give up or gain when choosing a university. Ideally, the high school senior will have applied for scholarships and grants to their preferred school in order to defray costs. Loans are a frequently utilized option, but it is important not to take on more debt than one can realistically pay off. If the education is going to be extremely expensive, it is important to have a career plan to ensure that money can be repaid.

Choosing whether or not to seek post-secondary education can be a daunting decision, but it can also be a life-changing one. Even if the decision has not been made, it is important to continue working on college prep classes so that the option is there.

College Tuition Costs are Spiralling

So, our children want to fly away from the nest and further their academic life in college. But with escalating costs, can we afford it? Will they have to take part time jobs to stay afloat or can we supplement their financial needs with college loans?

These are just some of the questions that concerned parents and aspiring students are asking themselves nowadays. It’s hardly surprising when you look at the facts – a 51% increase in fee and tuition costs for public four year colleges and a 36% rise for private four year colleges in the last decade alone. This, coupled with the disproportionate income increases for families likely to have college age children, means that more and more often parents or students themselves are turning to direct loans or private college loans for help.

Why do parents and students need extra help?

Every parent and family is made aware what their Expected Financial Contribution (EFC) will be to their child’s further education when they apply for a place. This is calculated minus any government grants and federal supported college loans the student will be granted. Every family has numerous financial commitments and additional support for your child throughout college could be all too much to bear if you don’t have enough savings or disposable income. But all is not lost! There are other sources of financial support available.

How can the shortfall be covered?

Additional financial support comes in all shapes and sizes. They normally take the forms of unsubsidized federal student loans, state sponsored loans and private sector college loans. It is the latter that has experienced the most significant growth over ten years (a 745% increase) and accounts for a whopping $10.5 billion of aid used to finance college education.

The private college loans available can be split into student loans or loans for the parent:

Student Loans

o Private college loans from banks and other funding sources.

Parent Loans

o Private education loans from banks and other funders.

o Home equity loans to draw down equity from your property. These funds can be used to pay for college fees.

Is it all worth it?

Its all too easy for parents and students to balk at the idea of taking out college loans to enable them to further their education. The hard cash needed to see them through up to four years of study may seem impossible to raise but they just need to realize the benefits this will bring their child and America. College educated individuals earn more than secondary school leavers, they also participate in society more and their children will attain higher levels of education too.

The investment is worth it.

6 Helpful Tips on How to Choose the Best University

Deciding on a university is the first step towards becoming independent. The list of universities that you would want to go to can be random, or comprise of those institutions that you have thoroughly researched. The process of picking out a university that is best suited for you can be a little daunting. Following are some tips that can help speed up the process and minimize the pressure.

1. Opting for the Subject of Your Choice

Choosing a course that interests you holds the utmost importance. You will not only be studying it for the next few years but, it will determine your future successes. In order to first select a subject, you need to carry out research via the internet and attend as many university open houses as possible to learn, and gather information on which field of study appeals to you. In addition to that, surfing the internet for electives, or job abundance can also assist in making the right decision.

2. Looking Up University Rankings

Every known university will have a general ranking available on the internet. The best universities have separate tables for each subject, while some have calculated averages on display. For a student, comparing the ratios of one university with another, will bear fruit. For example, the student to staff ratio in different universities will determine the amount of individual attention that a teacher can give. The lower this ratio is, the better it is for a student.

3. Scaling the Library

When you are going to a university to study, it is a given that you will spend most of your time in the library. Visiting the library while on campus tour is highly recommended as it will help you judge your environment. Checking out cafes that operate 24 hours a day should also be on your list of things to consider before choosing that particular university.

4. Researching the Courses

After selecting a course, gathering information on its components will be the next step. The university website can serve to be quite useful when a student decides to delve into the details of the course that they have chosen. Moreover, universities often have several channels through which they can be contacted, should any queries arise.

5. Student Life at a University

The primary reason for attending a university is to get a degree, but that does not mean you cannot enjoy your life on campus by indulging into various other activities that the university has to offer. Student Unions can help bring you up to speed on the events held or organized by the members of the society that interests you, or any extra-curricular activities. The same information can also be looked up on the university website.

6. Location

Perhaps the most important factor when choosing a university is its accessibility. Since becoming independent is part of the university experience, you don’t want a university that’s too close to home and not one that’s too far either. The costs that you may incur when traveling to and from home and the time consumed, are also factors that will determine your choice of university.